It’s Time to Apply!

The deadline for online, certificate-only applications for spring  2016 admission to the Michigan State University Graduate Certificate Program in Serious Games is November 15, 2015.  That means you need to get started now!

Here is a link to information about the program. And here is application information for online students.

Please contact me for more information.

Carrie Heeter, PhD, Professor of Media and Information
heeter@msu.edu

APPLY NOW: Online Graduate Certificate in Serious Games due Nov 15

November 15 is the deadline to apply for January admission to Michigan State University’s fully online Serious Game Graduate Certificate program for January admission.

The program consists of three graduate courses: Foundations of Serious Games (intro to the field, game design with a serious twist), Theories for Game and Interaction Design, and Understanding Users (approaches and methods for understanding players at all stages of the design process).  Together they provide you with a formal academic framework for thinking about and designing meaningful play.

Game Night at the Meaningful Play 2014 featured 33 digital games that offered diverse forms of meaningful play.

Game Night at the Meaningful Play 2014 featured 33 digital games and 9 non-digital games that offered diverse experiences of meaningful play.

Serious games are games with a purpose beyond entertainment.  They can be educational games, persuasive games, games for health, games to change the world, games for work, games as work, and more.  For example, MSU just hosted the Meaningful Play conference. Games exhibited included astronaut exergames, mental health games, games about mosquitoes, microbes, mathland, and surviving the zombie apocalypse, music games, calculus games, hero games, museum games, safe sex games, games to prevent violence against women, recycling games, Jewish culture games, saving money games, meditation games and making games. Continue reading

Meaningful Play 2014:  Get ready for radical transformation!

by Carrie Heeter

If you’re looking for answers to the challenges of racism, sexism, and video games: social justice campaigns and the struggle for gamer identity, you’ll find those answers embodied in the presenters and attendees of Meaningful Play 2014.  Lisa Nakamura begins the dialog with her preconference Quello Lecture and discussion Wednesday evening, October 15.

Meaningful Play MonsterIf you’re thinking Nakamura’s lecture is the only time such issues will be addressed at the conference, think again.  Opening keynote Mia Consalvo will discuss challenges such as marginalization of our work in game studies and an increasingly loud pushback against greater diversity. She’ll talk about moving forward and making play increasingly meaningful to all of us.

Megan Gaiser, one of the first female CEO’s in the game industry, will share her vision for contagious creativity and leadership.

Drew Davidson, head of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon will celebrate the creative chaos that emerges with a wide diversity of content experts.

Attendees will be treated to panels, papers, and roundtable discussions about affection games, empathy games, other people simulators, representing culture, community and identity, gender, inclusive game design, & gaming culture.  Don’t miss sessions on diversity, games for the blind, crowdsourcing games, online game fraud, and race/ethnicity/diaspora. And of course, games for learning, games for K-12, University games, and games for older adults. And much more. Continue reading

Meaningful Play 2014 Early Registration Ends Monday, Sept. 15

Meaningful Play 2014 is an interdisciplinary academic conference that explores the potential of games to entertain, inform, educate, and persuade in meaningful ways.

The conference takes place October 16 – October 18 in East Lansing, Michigan USA and is hosted by Michigan State University.

The conference is for game designers, researchers, and students. The conference includes:

*** Six thought-provoking keynotes from leaders in academia and industry, including:

Jesse Schell, CEO of Schell Games and Distinguished Professor of Entertainment Technology, Carnegie Mellon University
Mia Consalvo, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Game Studies and Design at Concordia University in Montreal
Colleen Macklin, Director of PETLab (Prototyping Education and Technology Lab) and Associate Professor at Parsons The New School for Design
Deirdra Kiai, game designer, writer, programmer, musician, and visual artist
Jan Sircus, Principal of Studio Sircus, former Senior VP, Creative Development for Walt Disney Imagineering
Erin Hoffman, Game Design Lead at the Institute of Play’s GlassLab Continue reading

Professor Lisa Nakamura to deliver pre-conference Quello Lecture

Professor Lisa NamakuraMeaningful Play is pleased to announce that Professor Lisa Nakamura will deliver the pre-conference Quello Lecture on Wednesday evening, 7pm, October 15, 2014.

Professor Nakamura is an acclaimed cultural critic of visual representations and mechanics of race, gender, and sexuality in gaming culture, digital media, and transmedia. She is the Gwendolyn Calvert Baker Collegiate Professor in the American Cultures Department and Screen Arts Department at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

The author of four books, numerous academic journal and popular press pieces, her work includes game-related titles such as:

  • Pregnant Sims: Avatars and the Visual Culture of Motherhood on the Web
  • Flag as Inappropriate: Neglected Discourses of Racism, Sexism, and Homophobia in Online Games
  • Queer Female of Color: The Highest Difficulty Setting There Is? Gaming Rhetoric as Gender Capital.
  • Don’t Hate the Player, Hate the Game: The Racialization of Labor in World of Warcraft
  • Griefing Culture and Incivility on the Internet
  • All the Work without the Worker: Racial Microaggression and the New Orientalism in World of Warcraft
  • Digital Gaming, Racial and Ethnic Identity, and Social Justice

Her insightful analyses help make the invisible visible.

We hope you will join us for a lively discussion. Her talk is open to conference attendees and the general public.